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24th PGA Grand Slam of Golf


Poipu Bay Golf Course Again Hosted Golf's Elite Four

The PGA Grand Slam of Golf is the season-ending showcase of golf's major champions. For 13 consecutive years, ending in 2006. this most exclusive of golf events was played at the Poipu Bay venue.

The 25th Grand Slam takes place October 16-17, 2007 in Bermuda.

Since 1979, the Grand Slam has brought together each year's winners of the Masters, the U.S. Open, the British Open, and the PGA Championship, making the Grand Slam the event with the most difficult entry requirement in the game of golf.

Tiger Woods rallied to win the 24th PGA Grand Slam of Golf for a record seventh straight time, closing with a bogey-free 6-under 66 on Wednesday to beat Jim Furyk by two strokes.

The Poipu Bay Golf Course hosted the two-day, 36-hole event, which featured a $1.25 million purse.

In recent years, the event has included such golf notables as Phil Mickelson, Tiger Woods, Retief Goosen, Vijay Singh, Jim Furyk, and Greg Norman. Tiger Woods won the exclusive 36-hole event for a record sixth time last year, closing with an 8-under 64 for a seven-stroke victory over Phil Mickelson. Only once has Woods failed to claim the Grand Slam trophy. Explaining how he does it, Woods said, "I feel very comfortable here. Most of the holes really suit my eye, and for some reason, I just kind of put it together every time I've come here." Woods finished with a 13-under 131 total.

After a five-way tie early in the final round of this year's Masters on April 9 at Augusta National, Phil Mickelson took the outright lead with a long strike to the par-5 eighth that landed 2 feet behind the hole for birdie. Mickelson captured the win by closing with a 3-under 69 for a two-shot victory over Tim Clark, allowing him to don his second green jacket in three years.

Australia's Geoff Ogilvy snagged the 106th U. S. Open silver trophy at Winged Foot in Mamoroneck, New York on June 18, with the media claiming he didn't so much win it as Phil Mikelson and Colin Montgomerie lost in a spectacular display of self-destruction on the final hole. Ogilvy's 30-foot chip into the cup to save par at the 17th, and a par at 18 after his drive landed in a sand divot brought him to the six-foot putt on the final hole that gave him a 72 for the day and left him at 5-over 285, the highest winning Open score since Hale Irwin's 7-over 287 in the 1974 Open at this same venue. World-ranked 50th at the start of this year, Ogilvy had triumphed only once on the PGA Tour prior to this season before landing this, his first major title.

For Mickelson and Montgomerie the 106th U. S. Open tournament will long be remembered as the day they botched their own chances at glory by ending with unthinkable double bogeys at Winged Foot's treacherous 450-yard 18th hole. Mickelson's woes began with a tee shot that hit a hospitality tent. Montgomerie's poor club choice left him with a 40-foot par putt, which he overran by 10 feet.

On July 20th, the British Open returned to Royal Liverpool Golf Club, Hoylake after a 39-year absence. In a near-perfect display of shot-making, championship defender Tiger Woods claimed his third Open title. Successful course management, precise putting, and accuracy with irons led Woods to a score of -18 to par (3 eagles, 19 birdies, 43 pars, 7 bogeys). Woods just edged out Chris DiMarco, who finished alone in second, two shots back, at 16 under par. Having recently lost his father to prostate cancer, an emotional Woods burst into tears and dedicated the victory to his dad's memory.

The legend of Tiger Woods grew as he blew away the field August 20 at the 88th PGA Championship in Medinah, Illinois with a 4-under 68 that sent him to a giant five-shot victory over runner-up Shaun Micheel and his 12th career major title. With nine holes left, Woods had tied the tournament record of 18 under par and had a four-shot lead. He played the final nine in even-par 36. Going into the Championship Woods was tied at 11 majors with the great Walter Hagen for second place on the all-time list. Wood's 51 victories tie him for sixth on the all-time list with Billy Casper. He is 31 behind the leader, the late Sam Snead. And Woods is only 30 years old.

Since the amazing Tiger Woods bagged two majors, an alternate is required for the fourth Grand Slam slot. Jim Furyk, 2003 U.S. Open champion, completes the Grand Slam foursome in this hardest-of-golf-events for which to qualify. Furyk earned the fourth and final spot by amassing the most points on the Major Champions Points List, which is composed of past major champions who compete in the current year's majors. With 270.33 points, Furyk bested Ernie Els (239) and Mike Weir (219.16).

Started as a single-day, 18-hole stroke play event, today's PGA Grand Slam is a two-day, 36-hole stroke play tournament. The change to a two-day, stroke play format came in 1991, when the event was first played in Hawaii at the Kauai Lagoons Resort. In 1998 and 1999, the PGA tried the match-play format, which pits one player against another in hole-by-hole competition. The event was again played over two days, with players seeded for play by their world rankings at the time of the event. The winners of the first two matches played for the PGA Grand Slam title on the second day. In 2000, the PGA returned to the current format.

The Poipu Bay Golf Course, stretching to just over 7,000 yards for the PGA Grand Slam, was built in 1991 under the design of Robert Trent Jones, Jr. The course offers scenic views of both the ocean and mountains and normally plays in windy but sunny conditions. The course has four lakes that come into play on five holes, including the 18th hole, a 550-yard par-5. Whether seen on television or in person, the 24th Grand Slam of Golf promises both exciting golf and spectacular scenery.



Woods Dominates in Record 6th Win at 23rd PGA Grand Slam of Golf

Tiger Woods has played in the PGA Grand Slam of Golf seven times, and six times he has left Hawaii with the trophy. He finished with an 8-under 64 to win by seven shots over Phil Mickelson.

"I feel very comfortable here," said Woods, who earned $400,000 and finished with a 13-under 131 total. "Most of the holes really suit my eye and for some reason. I just kind of put it together every time I've come here."

Mickelson, the PGA champion, shot a 68 to earn $250,000. U.S. Open champion Michael Campbell had a 70 to finish 12 strokes back, collecting $200,000. Vijay Singh was another stroke behind after a 69. He took home $150,000.

Woods was never seriously threatened. He opened with a 67 for a three-stroke lead over Mickelson, and quickly widened the gap to five with birdies on Nos. 2 and 3.

He finished with two eagles, five birdies and a bogey in relatively calm conditions on the oceanside 7,123-yard Poipu Bay Golf Course. He was bogey-free on the back nine for the second day.

"Tiger was so far ahead, you couldn't stop him," Campbell said. "He's a great challenge and a great player."

On the 573-yard sixth hole, Woods split the fairway with a 344-yard drive and hit a 5-iron, to set up a 55-foot, uphill putt that curled to the left and dropped into the cup. The gallery roared as Woods sheepishly grinned.

On the par-5 14th, Woods drove 293 yards into the wind and blasted a 3-wood from 244 yards out onto the green.

"Oh baby, how about this shot I just hit," he said, watching the towering shot. "That was pretty cool."

He then holed a 12-foot eagle putt and barely missed a 65-foot eagle putt on the final hole.

"It's more luck than anything else. It really is," he said.

Woods showed no signs of a virus that caused him to lose six pounds, vomit during the opening round and miss Monday's pro-am, or the ankle he twisted while successfully defending his Dunlop Phoenix title last weekend in Japan.

"My stomach's good. I got a great night's rest," he said.

Woods won six times on tour this year, including the Masters and British Open, and finished atop the money list with more than $10 million. He last qualified for Kauai in 2002, earning his fifth straight Grand Slam title by beating Davis Love III and Justin Leonard by 14 strokes.

Mickelson, who had a 13-under 59 to win the Grand Slam by five strokes over Singh last year, birdied Nos. 5, 6 and 8 to cut Woods' lead to three strokes at the turn.

But Mickelson's tee shot landed in the pond on the 193-yard 11th, and Woods birdied the hole to take a six-shot advantage, virtually sealing the win.

"To be honest with you, I'm surprised that there wasn't more of those," he said. "I felt very rusty. I didn't feel like I was on top of my game, but I was able to keep in play with the exception of that shot."

Lefty said he wasn't too disappointed with his finish, considering he hadn't touched a club in five weeks.

"It was kind of a fun, friendly round of golf," he said. "There wasn't much of a competition going on out there, so we just enjoyed the day."

Campbell had a shaky start and struggled on the tricky greens in his Poipu debut, but managed three birdies on his bogey-free back nine to finish the tournament under par.

"It was nice to finish under par," he said. "I think Vijay and I were playing for the wooden spoon."

The New Zealander was a local favorite this week in his first trip to the islands.

"It's the Polynesian connection between the Maori and the Hawaiians," he said. "It's like playing at home."

Singh, selected as an alternate in the event based on his performance in this year's majors, birdied the first two holes of the day, but couldn't make a move, parring the next 10 holes.

"I need some work, looking how Tiger played," said Singh, who spends hours at the gym and range every day.

It was the worst Grand Slam showing for Singh, who has three runner-up finishes.



23rd PGA Grand Slam of Golf
Poipu Bay Course Again Hosts Golf's Elite Four
by Cathy Crary, Managing Editor, Kauai Magazine


The PGA Grand Slam of Golf, the season-ending showcase of golf's major champions, returns to picturesque Poipu Bay Golf Course this winter. Year 2005 represents the 12th consecutive year the event has been played at Poipu Bay.

Since 1979, the Grand Slam has brought together each year's winners of the Masters, U.S. Open, British Open, and PGA Championship. The 23rd Grand Slam takes place November 21-23, 2005. The Poipu Bay Golf Course hosts the two-day, 36-hole event, which features a $1 million purse. The PGA Grand Slam of Golf (which has the most difficult qualification in the game) is televised to nearly 89 million U.S. homes by TNT Network, and to more than 100 countries worldwide.

Poipu Bay Golf CourseIn recent years, the event has included such golf notables as Phil Mickelson, Tiger Woods, Retief Goosen, Vijay Singh, Jim Furyk, and Greg Norman. Last year's Grand Slam winner, Phil Mickelson, made Grand Slam history with an amazing 13-under-par 59, which shattered the PGA Grand Slam of Golf record of 61 and registered the lowest round of Mickelson's life. Mickelson gained his place in the Grand Slam with his win of the Masters in Augusta, Georgia.

This year, at the age of 29, Tiger Woods won his fourth green jacket on April 10th at the 69th Masters Tournament at Augusta National with a 15-foot birdie putt on a playoff hole against veteran Chris DiMarco. Woods' fourth Masters title and his ninth major victory ended a run of 10 straight major events without a victory. A playoff was needed after Woods bogeyed the par-4, No. 18 hole and DiMarco sunk a six-foot par putt to match 72-hole scores of 12-under-par 270. With a 15-foot birdie putt on the first playoff hole, Woods beat DiMarco and joined Hall of Fame members Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer as the only golfers to win the Masters more than three times.

With his fourth Masters win, Tiger Woods earned his seventh trip to the PGA Grand Slam of Golf. Woods, a five-time Grand Slam winner, will be joined by the winners of the U.S. Open, the Open Championship and the PGA Championship. In the photo on the right, Phil Mickelson helps Tiger put on the green.

Virtually unknown New Zealander, Michael Campbell, surprised himself and everyone else on June 19th in Pinehurst, NC by winning the 105th U.S. Open. Playing the round of his life on that Sunday (a 69 for an even-par total of 280), Campbell barely held off a hard-charging Tiger Woods by two shots. Last year's winner, Retief Goosen held a three-shot lead at the start of play but experienced a meltdown that left him with a final round of 81-288, and a tie for 11th place. Campbell almost gave up the game of golf in 1998 after a wrist injury. His play suffered and he lost his status on several worldwide tours. Just two weeks before his win in Pinehurst, Campbell entered the first U.S. Open qualifying tournament ever held in Europe, and earned himself a spot in the field. Campbell is Maori (the indigenous people of New Zealand) and is the first New Zealander to win a major championship since Bob Charles won the British Open at Royal Lytham in 1963.

On Sunday, July 17, Tiger Woods did it again, sailing to a five-stroke victory in the British Open at St. Andrews, Scotland. If he hadn't fumbled a chip and missed a short putt at the U.S. Open in June, Woods could have been going for the Grand Slam at the PGA Championship in August. In a week of superlative golf, with record numbers of eagles scored in warm and sunny conditions, Woods' final round, a two-under-par 70, brought him to 14-under 274 for the championship-five shots off his record total in 2000, when he won in St. Andrews by eight. With his "Old Course" win, Woods became the third player to win 10 major professional titles, closing the gap on the way to Jack Nicklaus' record of 18. The only golfer in between is Walter Hagen at 11 titles.

Phil Mickelson secured his membership in the elite club of multiple major winners when he was victorious at Baltusrol Golf Club in New Jersey on Monday, August 15, 2005. He drained a two-foot putt on the 72nd hole, finishing 4-under 276, and winning the PGA Championship with a one-stroke victory over Thomas Bjorn and Steve Elkington. Capturing the PGA after winning the Masters in 2004 puts Mickelson in a select group of 74 players who have won two or more majors. The winning putt at Baltusrol this year wasn't nearly as long as his 18-footer to win the 2004 Masters, but it was a sweet finish to a tough season and tournament that stretched over five days at Baltusrol by a storm-delayed final round. Mickelson had the pressure of being in the lead for four straight days. Then, on the 18th hole, he played the chip shot first learned in his backyard as a kid. That got him within two feet for a birdie on the final hole, validation as a major force in golf, and the fourth slot in the 2005 PGA Grand Slam.

Started as a single-day, 18-hole stroke play event, today's PGA Grand Slam is a two-day, 36-hole stroke play tournament. The change to a two-day, stroke play format came in 1991, when the event was first played in Hawaii at the Kauai Lagoons Resort. In 1998 and 1999, the PGA tried the match-play format, which pits one player against another in hole-by-hole competition. The event was again played over two days, with players seeded for play by their world rankings at the time of the event. The winners of the first two matches played for the PGA Grand Slam title on the second day. In 2000, the PGA returned to the current format.

The Poipu Bay Golf Course, stretching to just over 7,000 yards for the PGA Grand Slam, was built in 1991 under the design of Robert Trent Jones, Jr. The course offers scenic views of both the ocean and mountains and normally plays in windy but sunny conditions. The course has four lakes that come into play on five holes, including the 18th hole, a 550-yard par-5. Whether seen on television or in person, the 23rd Grand Slam of Golf promises exciting golf and spectacular scenery.

Article courtesy of Kauai Magazine.



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